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GEORGETOWN, Guyana, Apr 06 2017 – The United States says it is committed to providing assistance to countries like Guyana that are in the early stages of developing an oil and gas industry.

A delegation from the US Department of State’s Energy Governance and Capacity Initiative (EGCI) Wednesday held talks with Attorney General and Minister of Legal Affairs Basil Williams.

A government statement issued after the talks noted that Washington is “committed to building infrastructural and institutional databases as well as to providing technical assistance to countries that are in the early stages of developing an oil and gas industry.

“The team has committed to assisting in the oil and gas initiative as well as making observations on existing practices. The team hopes to subsequently make recommendations based on their observations to further achieve this goal.”

It said the delegation also agreed with the Attorney General that an excellent regulatory framework is needed for the petroleum industry.

“This should be complemented by specialists in every field including specialist accountants. The E-governance Bill will bear directly on the petroleum industry.”

Williams said that the Guyana Government is committed to developing the oil and gas industry by utilising highly trained specialists and experts and alluded to the recent appointment of Dr. Jan Mangal as the Adviser on Petroleum to the President.

He said government intends to establish a sovereign wealth fund to enable the country to obtain long-term investment and financial benefits from it oil and mineral resources. The fund will significantly benefit the country’s economy and citizens.

The team will be in the country from April 5-12, 2017 to report to the Government of Guyana on its deliverables under its work plan, among other things, the statement noted.

Late last month, President David Granger reiterated his government’s commitment to the development of the country’s oil and gas sector, promising that there will be an atmosphere of transparency and trust.

The US-based oil company, ExxonMobil affiliate, Esso Exploration and Production Guyana Ltd have in the past few months announced oil discoveries at Liza and Payara.

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The Opening Ceremony of The Fifth Caribbean Sustainable Energy Forum (CSEF) held at The Hilton. Prime Minister of The Bahamas, Perry G. Christie along with Minister of the Environment and Housing, Kenred Dorsett pictured. Photos Shawn Hanna

NASSAU, The Bahamas, Feb 06 2017 – Participants  at a recently concluded high level forum want energy to be placed squarely before the Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Heads of Government to generate speedier action and firmer commitments to the transition to renewables.

The general thinking at the Fifth Caribbean Sustainable Energy Forum (CSEF V) held from 23 – 25 January, 2017, in The Bahamas, was that while there is steady progress, the challenges of transitioning to clean energy can be solved if they are placed in a political context. This is against the background of the promotion of sustainable energy as the vehicle through which CARICOM Member States will become economically competitive and advance the human services that are required for an acceptable quality of life. The bottom line is the availability of more reliable energy and the ability of citizens of the Community to enjoy cleaner energy, hence the need for political attention.

Over two days at the British Colonial Hilton, Nassau, The Bahamas, several panels featuring government Ministers and some of the biggest names in the regional energy field discussed a range of issues pertinent to the Community’s transition from fossil fuels to renewable energy. Discussions centred on the CARICOM Energy Policy (CEP) and the Caribbean Sustainable Energy Roadmap and Strategy (C-SERMS) and regulatory matters; building a culture of effective statistics and information management; funding the transition; and identifying knowledge, skills and quality requirements.

The Forum, which attracted more than 100 people also looked back at progress in energy transition made over the past five years and looked forward to the next 10 years.

The final session on Wednesday 25 January, focused on the outlook of the Region’s energy transition from fossil fuels to cleaner energy. The keynote presenter was Dr. Devon Gardner, Programme Manager, Energy, at the CARICOM Secretariat, while the discussants were Ian Douglas, Minister of Trade, Energy and Employment, Dominica; Dr. Kenrick Leslie, Executive Director, Caribbean Community Climate  Change Centre (CCCCC); Dr. Albert Binger, Interim Director, Caribbean Centre for Renewable Energy and  Energy Efficiency (CCREEE) and Mr. Robert Wright, Managing Director, New Leaf Power. The moderator was Prof. Arthouros Zervos, Chairman, Renewable Energy Policy Network for the 21st Century (REN21).

It was during that session that participants said the time had come for a special meeting of CARICOM Heads of Government on energy. With the understanding that a regional initiative in practical terms was needed going forward, the panelists and participants suggested that concrete success stories should be brought before the Heads of Government to highlight the strengths as well as the challenges and for there to be decisions, at that level, on matters that the sector is fighting to solve. There were calls for approaches to be made first to the Heads of Government with responsibility for energy and sustainable development in the CARICOM Quasi Cabinet to catalyse efforts towards the special meeting on energy. CARICOM Heads meet next in Georgetown, Guyana, mid-February.

In the past, special meetings of the Community’s Council for Trade and Economic Development (COTED) were held on energy. It was at one such meeting in 2013 that the CEP and the C-SERMS were approved. The C-SERMS aims at a renewable energy electricity penetration of 20 percent in 2017, 28 percent by 2022 and 47 percent by 2027. The proposal for the establishment of CCREEE was also placed before CARICOM Heads of Government in 2015. Back in 2003, Heads of Government, at a special meeting in Castries, Saint Lucia, discussed energy, within the context of the CARICOM Single Market and Economy (CSME). At that meeting they also discussed work that was ongoing on the CEP.

Energy is also inserted in the CARICOM Five-Year Strategic Plan under Building Economic Resilience, the primary of the Plan’s six priority areas. Efficiency, diversification and cost reduction are over-arching elements of the energy thrust. The focus is on optimising existing assets and reducing the high cost of energy inputs – particularly in production. This will be done through enhanced functional cooperation, and development of alternative energy to meet CARICOM’s 2017 target of 20 percent for the contribution of renewable energy to the total electricity supply mix. The Strategy addresses energy efficiency across all sectors, development and use of renewable energy and market reform to allow for access of renewable energy to the electricity network, building awareness and capacity within Member States, and facilitating public-private partnership in energy development and build on the CEP.

Ten years from now

Among the areas that the Forum recommended that the Region must consider going forward, are the recognition of the renewable resources of each CARICOM Member States and the advantages and disadvantages these hold; the role fossil fuels will continue to play and vested interest in the fossil fuel industry; enhancing energy sector infrastructure including refurbishing obsolete and near obsolete electricity grids; the connection between quality of life of CARICOM nationals and reliable, cleaner energy; and the effects of climate change on energy transition.

Other priority areas identified for focus over the next ten years are: training and capacity-building in planning, policy; information management and project preparation to ensure a pool of highly skilled human resources as well as job creation; private partnership and financing measures to drive the energy transformation efforts; greater collaboration among Member States and regional institutions; significant local ownership in the energy sector; innovation in thought and practice in the Caribbean; the establishment of a regional energy trade arrangement and commercial exploitation of renewable energy.

The forward-looking session also considered the impact of sustainable energy on agriculture and food security; the necessity for a regulatory environment; and continuity of sustainable energy programmes. Participants warned that energy should not be considered in isolation, but within the context of sustainable development and across sectors.

CSEF was established in 2008 as a biennial sustainable energy event in the Caribbean Community (CARICOM).  The CARICOM Secretariat event was organised this year in collaboration with the Government of The Bahamas. Support for the staging of the Forum was provided by: the US Government, through the Organisation of American States (OAS); the German Ministry of Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ), through the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) executed Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Technical Assistance (REETA) Programme; the CDB, through the Canadian Support to the Energy Sector in the Caribbean Fund; the IDB; and the World Bank through the SIDS DOCK Support Programme.

The Forum facilitates dialogue and actions towards the adoption of more robust policies and the transfer of appropriate technologies in renewable energy and energy efficiency in CARICOM. It seeks ultimately to enhance stakeholder support and contribution to diversification of the regional energy supply from its current fossil fuels base to a mix that includes significant renewable sources.

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Tessa Williams-Robertson, Head of Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Unit, Caribbean Development Bank is pictured giving remarks at The Opening Ceremony of The Fifth Caribbean Sustainable Energy Forum (CSEF) held at The Hilton. Photos Shawn Hanna

By Desmond Brown – Executive Editor

NASSAU, The Bahamas, Jan 23 2017 – An official of the Caribbean Development Bank (CDB) has reiterated a statement made by its president in 2014, which points to the need to move away from imported fossil fuels.

“Unless we can reduce our dependence on imported fossil fuels, and unless we can substantially reduce energy costs, we will not succeed in improving our competitiveness and reducing our vulnerability to external shocks,” Head of Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency at the CDB, Tessa Williams-Robertson said.

Speaking here at the opening of the fifth Caribbean Sustainable Energy Forum (CSEF), Mrs. Williams-Robertson said the meeting plays an important role in facilitating dialogue on sustainable energy development; creating a space for sharing good practices, ideas and lessons learned; and in driving decision-making, policy and action across the Caribbean.

Since 2015, the CDB has been making renewable energy and energy efficiency a consideration across investments in all sectors and Mrs Williams Robertson said there were immediate results associated with this thrust.

“Project planners in the education, agriculture and water sectors, were persuaded to include specific components to address the installation of solar PV where appropriate and/or subjected to energy audits to determine Energy Efficiency Measures,” she said.

“The Basic Needs Trust Fund, our flagship poverty-reduction programme, was a frontrunner in this process. Through small but critical interventions, BNTF powered schools in Guyana’s hinterland by incorporating solar PV with battery storage. Thanks to the installation of solar water pumps, villages – including those in rural areas of Guyana and Belize – now have better access to a reliable, potable supply of water.”

The CDB official noted that when the bank prioritised energy security in its strategic plan, it was aware that concessional financial would be critical to transforming the energy sector and it has been working diligently to mobilise such funding.

“Today we are pleased to report that we have had some successes in this area, raising grant resources and technical support from the Government of Canada; the European Investment Bank Climate Action Line of Credit; the European Union Caribbean Investment Facility, the Government of Germany, the Inter-American Development Bank-financed Sustainable Energy Facility, and the United Kingdom Department for International Development,” Mrs Williams-Robertson announced.

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Energy Programme Manager at the CARICOM Secretariat, Dr. Devon Gardner

NASSAU, The Bahamas, Jan 16 2017 – Key energy stakeholders will gather here next to take account of the Region’s transition to greater sustainable production and use.

Representatives of public and private sector entities, senior officials of national, regional and international institutions and industry experts will join Energy Ministers of Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Member States at the fifth Caribbean Sustainable Energy Forum (CSEF). More than 100 participants are expected at CSEF V which will be held 23-25 January.

CSEF V is a CARICOM Secretariat event which is organised in collaboration with the Government of The Bahamas. Support for the staging of the Forum is being provided by the United States (U.S.) Government, through the Organisation of American States (OAS); the German Ministry of Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ), through the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) executed Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Technical Assistance (REETA) Programme; the Caribbean Development Bank (CDB), through the Canadian Support to the Energy Sector in the Caribbean Fund; the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB); and the World Bank through the SIDS DOCK Support Programme.

Over the three days, participants will hone in on the CARICOM Energy Policy which was approved in 2013 and the Caribbean Sustainable Energy Roadmap and Strategy (C-SERMS) with a view to focusing on policy, planning and decision support mechanisms to enable game-changing investment to transform the regional energy matrix.

Energy Programme Manager at the CARICOM Secretariat, Dr. Devon Gardner said that the Forum will provide a greater understanding of what had taken place since the last CSEF and since the regional energy policy and C-SERMS were approved.

He anticipates that at CSEF V, there would be some amount of coalescence among the major actions or priority areas on which the Region should work over the next 10 years. He added that a realignment of the targets might be necessary. Another possible outcome, he said, would be the identification and agreement of potential roles of stakeholders to drive the transformation to sustainable energy.

CSEF was established as a biennial sustainable energy event in the Community. The previous events were held in July 2008 in Grenada, in June 2010 in Jamaica, in September 2012 in St. Kitts and Nevis, and in November 2014 in Barbados.

The Forum is intended to facilitate dialogue and actions towards the adoption of more robust policies and the transfer of appropriate technologies in renewable energy and energy efficiency in CARICOM. It seeks ultimately to enhance stakeholder support and contribution to diversification of the regional energy supply from its current fossil fuels base to a mix that includes significant renewable sources.

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This news article is a production distributed through Caribbean News Service. It is made freely available to your media and we encourage publishing and redistribution, giving credit to Caribbean News Service (CNS).  

By Sir Ronald Sanders – CNS Contributor

WASHINGTON, May 07 2016 – The transformation of the energy sector in Caribbean countries is the key to improving the economies of all of them.  Sustainably cheaper energy supplies for tourism, manufacturing, transportation and agriculture would contribute significantly to reduced costs in each of these sectors, boosting their production and making them more competitive internationally.

On the flip side of this argument, unless Caribbean countries do transform their energy sectors, their costs of production will continue to rise and they will become increasingly uncompetitive.  In turn, this will reduce employment, expand poverty, shrink the amount of revenues available to governments for spending on health, education and infrastructure.

Apart from Trinidad and Tobago, which is an oil and gas producer, the cost of electricity per kilowatt hour is as high as 45 US cents in the region; in the United States it is 5 US cents.  The comparison speaks for itself.  Doing any kind of business in the Caribbean, when compared with the US, is extremely high.  And, the comparison is not true only in relation to the US; a similar contrast exists with costs in European Union countries and many states in Latin America.

The energy sector, therefore, presents a great opportunity for every Caribbean country if advantage is taken of it.   Doing so, however, is by no means easy.  The Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Secretariat estimates that US$20 billion in investments will be required if countries are collectively to fulfil by 2027 the roadmap and strategies that they have set themselves.

One thing is for sure, cash-strapped and highly indebted as many Caribbean governments are, the required investment can’t come from public finance resources alone; much of the capital outlay will have to come from the private sector, particularly foreign companies with an established track record in renewable energy sources rather than oil.

That proposition raises a number of issues, not least among them resistance from local companies with a vested interest in maintaining the present energy system.  In some Caribbean countries, companies responsible for delivering electricity or selling it to the national grid, currently earn huge profits from their operations, particularly as they are either poorly regulated or not regulated at all.  Hence, they set rates without any independent calculation or verification of their costs; they simply negotiate rates with governments, many of whom have little room for hard bargaining.

The establishment of strong, effective and well-qualified regulatory agencies in many parts of the Caribbean is, therefore, an important first step in energy transformation.  Rates have to be set on justifiable and transparent grounds with a reasonable level of profitability for dividends to shareholders and re-investment for expansion and upgrading of plant and equipment.

Another key area is creating conditions for investment.  Such conditions should not involve giving away taxes and duties. Investment in the energy sector ought to be focussed on renewable energy sources, such as thermal, solar and wind so that they can be added to the energy mix, resulting in lower costs to consumers.  And, such investment should allow reasonable rates of return on investment without governments giving away tax revenues.

Attracting such investment will require legislation for fair regulation, rights to repatriate dividends from profits, and provisions against nationalisation without compensation at market prices.

The task, while hard, is not impossible.  Studies show that the US Virgin Islands, in 2015, had reduced dependency on fossil fuel by approximately 20% from 7 years ago.  And, Costa Rica produced 99% of its electricity from renewable sources in 2015 and is still developing new geothermal and wind resources that will generate more energy in the future.   These are only two examples of many others, but both these countries are competitors of the 14 CARICOM nations.  The comparison underlines the point that, without energy transformation, CARICOM countries will become uncompetitive in almost every sector and their economies will decline.

Addressing energy transformation assumes a greater urgency because many of the existing power plants are old and inefficient.  The cost of replacing them and their distribution systems, which must be undertaken as much for the social needs of the local population as for the imperatives of economic growth and development, would be considerably cheaper and sustainable in the medium and long term if sustainable energy sources are employed.

A few Caribbean countries have started down the road of developing renewable sources of energy. For instance, the possibilities of geothermal energy are being explored in Dominica, St Lucia, St Vincent and the Grenadines and St Kitts-Nevis.  In Antigua and Barbuda, a 3 megawatt solar plant has been installed and is operating.  Jamaica is now way ahead of the pack with huge private sector investments in wind and solar energy, contributing to an average price of electricity of US 24 cents per kilowatt hour, down from US 40 cents in 2011.

In Washington DC on May 4, a US-Caribbean meeting was held, under the Chairmanship of US Vice President Joe Biden.  The meeting was beneficial because it exposed Caribbean countries to US companies with which they might partner in transitioning the energy sector from total reliance on fossil fuels to a mix with renewable energy sources.

The most significant event was the signing of a Memorandum of Understanding between the Inter-American Development Bank, the Caribbean Development Bank the United States Department of Energy, and the CARICOM Secretariat.  Importantly, one of the goals of the MOU is to establish an “Energy co-financing Facility for Caribbean Sustainability”, particularly focused on efforts to attract international investors.

It is on access to funding that greater emphasis and effort have to be devoted to attract investment on terms that benefit both the investor and the countries in which they invest, and to give the Caribbean region the energy it needs.

(The writer is Antigua and Barbuda’s Ambassador to the US and the OAS.  He is also Senior Fellow at the Institute of Commonwealth Studies, London University and Massey College, Toronto University.  The views expressed are his own)

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This news article is a production distributed through Caribbean News Service. It is made freely available to your media and we encourage publishing and redistribution, giving credit to Caribbean News Service (CNS).  

MONTREAL, Apr 14 2016 – In anticipation of the discussions to take place at the 13th meeting of the
Conference of Parties (COP 13) to the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) later this year, Latin
American and Caribbean Ministers of Environment have adopted a decision to enhance implementation of the Convention and its Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2011-2020.

In particular, the decision supports actions to mainstream biodiversity into productive sectors, and to implement regional and sub-regional plans to support implementation efforts.

“This is a very positive decision and shows that the region is prepared to move forward on key
mainstreaming issues for biodiversity,” said Braulio Ferreira de Souza Dias, Executive Secretary of the Convention on Biological Diversity. “Momentum towards a successful COP 13 has now been clearly established.”

COP 13 will take place in Cancun, Mexico, in December 2016.

In the decision, taken at the 20th Forum of Ministers of Environment of Latin America and the Caribbean in Cartagena, Colombia, ministers agreed to promote, at COP 13, the adoption of decisions in support of holistic and integrated approaches towards mainstreaming biodiversity, including the strengthening of legal and institutional frameworks, and to link this with communication strategies targeted at relevant sectors.

Ministers recognised the importance of the restoration agenda in agreeing to build support for a decision at COP 13 that would provide financing for ecological restoration of degraded ecosystems and their ecosystem functions, taking into account issues of connectivity with protected areas.
Ministers also agreed to develop a Regional Cooperation Programme on Biodiversity to help build
national capacities for the implementation of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, in addition to the Strategic Plan for Biodiversity. The programme will focus on a number of strategic sectors, including: agriculture and cattle raising, forestry, mining, exploitation of hydrocarbons, energy, fisheries and tourism sectors, and would include measures to encourage active participation of other actors, including local governments, the private sector, indigenous peoples and local communities, civil society and social movements.

There was agreement to support ongoing work on the elaboration of a Caribbean Biodiversity Strategy for Small Island Developing States, as an important means of enhancing the implementation of the Convention in the Caribbean Basin.

The Convention’s protocols were also of interest to the Ministers, who agreed to promote the adoption and implementation, in the region, of the Nagoya Protocol on Access and Benefit Sharing and of the Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety and the Nagoya-Kuala Lumpur Supplementary Protocol on Liability and Redress to the Cartagena Protocol.

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This news article is a production distributed through Caribbean News Service. It is made freely available to your media and we encourage publishing and redistribution, giving credit to Caribbean News Service (CNS).

ST JOHN’S, Antigua, Mar 30 2016 – Antigua and Barbuda has welcomed a US$52 million hotel project by Trinidad and Tobago investors and developers praising them for making “the bold decision to make a tangible investment in our country”.

Tourism, Economic Development, Investment and Energy Minister, Asot Michael, said the project by investors and project developers, Imtiyaz Adam and Farman Ramjohn, is part of the Gaston Browne’s administration’s plan to make the country an economic powerhouse in the Caribbean.

“We congratulate you and commend you for your vision in partnering with us in our own vision to develop and transform our beautiful country into an economic powerhouse in this region. Thank you for helping to position Antigua and Barbuda on a path to experience meaningful economic development for all our people.

“I am confident that what has been started on these 10 beautiful acres, is only the first step in the start of a mutually rewarding partnership with the Government and People of Antigua and Barbuda,” Michael said.

He said the LABAHIA Hotel Resort & Condominiums project between the Adams Investment Management (Antigua) Ltd. and the government will provide jobs, safety in housing, “and the international acclaim that we in this country strive for as a tourist destination second to none.

“Let it be known, that we in Antigua and Barbuda are extremely grateful to the directors of Adams Investment Management Group for their decision to choose Antigua and Barbuda as a key place in which to bring their comprehensive experience to bear fruit for the good of this nation.”

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CASTRIES, St. Lucia, Sep 24 2015 – It has just about become impossible to read a newspaper, watch television or listen to the radio for a 24-hour period without hearing about climate change. The whole thing sounds a bit worrying but despite all of the information, the phenomenon is still confusing and the ordinary young person of the Caribbean does not quite know what to expect from climate change, when it will happen, what they can do about it or how it will affect future generations.

So let us start at the beginning. What is climate change? “It is a change in climate which is attributed directly or indirectly to human activity that alters the composition of the global atmosphere and which is in addition to natural climate variability observed over comparable time periods.” Of course this is an official definition but in a nutshell it means that the weather patterns that we have come to expect year after year in the Caribbean will change and will no longer be as predictable as before.

The science that explains what is currently happening in our atmosphere and how it affects the oceans, the land and all life on Earth is sound. So we can brace ourselves for warmer days, shorter but heavier episodes of rainfall, longer and more intense droughts, stronger hurricanes, rising sea levels and other new phenomenon such as ocean acidification.

The rising sea levels should set off the alarms in our heads, given that most of us in the small islands and territories of the OECS live in low-lying coastal areas. Our homes, roads, ports and all buildings in these areas will be under threat of being washed away by rising seas and more powerful storm surges. Truth be told everything will be affected, from fishing to agriculture and tourism. Our traditional livelihoods and our way of life will be disrupted in one way or another. It will be a future laced with uncertainty. Already we are witnessing deaths from heat stroke, as happened in India and Pakistan this year, and more incidences of diseases transmitted by vectors.

Life is unlikely to be a bed of roses for us young people of the OECS region in the face of an environmental backlash. So many things we as young citizens in the OECS cherish so dearly such as carnival, entertainment and sports will not be the same if climate change continues unabated. It is almost unimaginable jumping carnival or playing 90 minutes of football in 40 degree heat. So for us young citizens, finding ways to avoid these horrific scenarios are important, as this is the future that we are facing. They have in the past been making efforts to have our voices and opinions heard by the governments of the OECS, as our leaders negotiate with the international community to reduce global emissions of carbon dioxide through the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) process.

Organisations like the Caribbean Youth Environment Network (CYEN) have been engaging the region’s young citizens and making an impact on the international arena to make our fellow young citizens aware of climate change and now we want our leaders to heed our pain, our anxiety, our plight and listen to us. Here it is.

This coming December at the UNFCCC Conference of the Parties (COP 21) in Paris, the OECS, Caribbean and the world will once again sit down to develop a plan to minimise the effects of climate change in coming years. It will not be an easy task, as countries will have different agendas and priorities and the plan must be agreeable to everyone. A very tall ask. However, for the people and the youth of the Caribbean, our very survival could depend on the outcome of these talks and so we need you the leaders to take firm positions to ensure that our nations are not further compromised. We as young citizens would follow the events closely to ensure that their interests and concerns are being taken into consideration.

Young people were born into this climate change debacle, we did not create it. It was the adults of this and previous generations who did, but clearly we will suffer the consequences of their actions. Our countries are already under economic stress and the scarce resources presently available will now have to be shared in the development of projects to adapt to climate change rather than on programmes to assist the development of youth and broader society. The levels of unemployment in the Caribbean and in particular the OECS are already high and with the expected negative impacts of climate change on livelihoods, further job losses can be expected. Undoubtedly then, it is our young citizens that will disproportionately feel the socio-economic pinch. Further, maybe jobs that we come to know like being a fisherman may not even be a viable option for us…So leaders we are worried!

What do we the young people from the OECS region want in an agreement at the Paris Conference? We want Global temperature rise to be kept below 1.5 degrees Centigrade, for the global community to have the ability to place sanctions on countries that surpass their CO2 emission quota and for greater emphasis to be placed on improving the current rate of energy transition from fossil fuels to cleaner forms of renewable energy. But perhaps most important of all, our young citizens want governments of the OECS and the Caribbean to create the opportunities for us to be able to participate, to contribute our ideas, our thoughts and solutions to the climate change debate. It is only fair, as the future belongs to us and we are crying out to be taken seriously.

This article is written by the Young citizens of the Caribbean Youth Environment Network (CYEN) in association with Mr. Reginald Burke of CYEN and Dr. Asha Singh of the OECS Commission. The article is produced as part of the Working Partnership on Climate Change Initiative (WPCC) supported by the Government of France. 

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